Rodent ancestors combined portions of blood and venom genes to make pheromones

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Experts who study animal pheromones have traced the evolutionary origins of genes that allow mice, rats and other rodents to communicate through smell. The discovery is a clear example of how ....

Continue reading

Neurons in spinal-cord injuries are reconnected in vivo via carbon nanotube sponges

From left to right: image of a healthy backbone (control); image of an injured backbone without an implant; image of an injured backbone in which the biocompatible nanomaterial has been implanted and where the neuronal ....

Continue reading

Machine learning takes on synthetic biology: algorithms can bioengineer cells for you

Berkeley Lab scientists Tijana Radivojevic (left) and Hector Garcia Martin working on mechanistic and statistical modeling, data visualizations, and metabolic maps at the Agile BioFoundry last year. Credit: Thor Swift/Berkeley Lab If you've eaten vegan ....

Continue reading

From star to solar system: How protoplanetary rings form in primordial gas clouds

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Four-hundred fifty light-years from Earth, a young star is glowing at the center of a system of concentric rings made from gas and dust, and it is producing planets, one for ....

Continue reading

Ammonium triggers formation of lateral roots

Localized ammonium supply enhances the import and accumulation of shoot-derived auxin into the root vasculature, generating an auxin source for lateral auxin movement. AMT-dependent ammonium uptake stimulates proton release, leading to apoplastic acidification and protonation ....

Continue reading

Cataclysmic variable V1460 Her has a fast spinning white dwarf accreting from an evolved donor star, study finds

The Warwick 1-meter telescope photometry for V1460 Her. Credit: Ashley et al., 2020. An international team of astronomers has conducted spectroscopic and photometric observations of a cataclysmic variable (CV) known as V1460 Her. Results of ....

Continue reading

Tiny biological package gets drug right to the ‘heart’ of transplant rejection

Johns Hopkins Medicine and NCI Frederick researchers have demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection therapy directly to a transplanted heart by packaging it within a tiny protein gel cocoon known ....

Continue reading